Helping people affected by cancer

Thanks to the incredible fundraising efforts of our Dry July participants every year, the Dry July Foundation is able to fund projects and programs that improve the comfort and wellbeing of people affected by cancer.

Everything we fund is to benefit cancer patients and their families and carers. We aim to make a difficult time, a little easier for those affected by cancer.

Where the money goes

Woman looking in a mirror smiling
Wellness Programs

Man and woman in a car, smilig
Transport Services

kitchen
Accommodation

Women in a wig library
Comfort Items



hands holding a tablet
Entertainment Items

chairs facing a tv in a waiting room
Facility Refurbishments

woman in chemo chair with staff
Hospital Equipment

woman smiling in call centre
Information Resources

Organisations we support

The Dry July Foundation is proud to support numerous cancer organisations across Australia. Some of the organisations who benefit from our fundraising include:

Cancer Council

Leukaemia Foundation

Look Good Feel Better

McGrath Foundation

Prostate Cancer Foundation of Australia

redkite

To see the full list of cancer support organisations we fund, please click here.

Hazel Bennini's Story

Hazel Bennini was diagnosed with lymphoma in 2016. Thankfully she is now officially in full remission.

Hazel first noticed something wasn’t quite right when she returned from an overseas trip in 2015. “I noticed a lump in my neck in October. Following some tests I remember my doctor called me at 7.30am on Christmas Eve morning to tell me to head straight to St Vincent’s for a bone marrow test. That’s when I found out the cancer had become very aggressive.”

Hazel underwent Chemotherapy from January to May. It was a very difficult time but she credits the staff at St Vincent’s Hospital’s Cancer Centre Chemotherapy Day Unit for helping to ease the burden.

“The staff were absolutely fabulous, very caring. There’s a lovely lady who comes...

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Going dry to support their patients

A team from St Vincent’s Oncology and Haematology ward are doing Dry July to give back to their inspiring patients.

6th Floor Dry July Team leader and Registered Nurse, Kate Gore said being in lockdown has made the team even more aware of how challenging life can be for patients diagnosed with cancer.

“We only have to make a small sacrifice by giving up alcohol for a month, whereas our patients make huge sacrifices daily, especially now. A lot of patients have long admissions and pre-COVID they could have visitors everyday but not during the pandemic,” Kate said.

The funds raised from last year’s campaign were used to purchase IPads. These have now been set up for the Virtual Visitor Program, which allows patients to connect with their...

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The team at Nepean Cancer Care are battling for first place!

Who will take home the Dry July Trophy and have bragging rights for the next twelve months? Last year’s winner Dr Deme Karikios raised $13,133.25, will he keep his title or will another crusader take his place?

Funds raised will directly support cancer patients in our community undergoing treatment at the centre.

Send the team a message of encouragement and keep those donations rolling in.


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A message from Bendigo Health Cancer Centre

Cancer Care Coordinator at Bendigo Health, Jenna Sing, has established a pet therapy program, personally adopting a black Labrador named Sharlee and achieving her public access license for an assistance dog! Jenna explained, “Pet therapy within cancer setting is extremely beneficial for oncology patients as it has the ability reduce stress and anxiety often associated with medical appointments and cancer treatment. Sharlee our pet therapy dog provides a calming presence within the Cancer Centre waiting room and it’s a valued member of the Cancer Centre team”

Sharlee has been in the Cancer Centre a total of 4 times and on Friday a patients didn’t even say hello to me, he just straight away said “Where is Sharlee?” This made me so happy...

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Honouring the legacy of a war hero

For 41 year old Bree, losing her dad to prostate cancer was the most devastating moment of her life.

The decorated war hero and accomplished catamaran pilot fought off the disease for nearly two decades, before succumbing to its spread.

Bree says he will always be missed.

“Everyone who knew dad would speak of his unwavering positivity and optimism even when fighting such a terrible disease.

“Even when, in January this year, he was told he had months to live, he was still making plans to go to Bathurst in October. His next goal was to meet his next grandchild. He was more optimistic than all of us put together.”

His passing left the family in grief, but more determined than ever to make a difference by giving hope to others.

“I'm going...

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By going Dry this July, you're helping St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne help people like Trevor.

Trevor Shewan loves to keep fit. Even at 70, he manages to cycle 40kms at least three times a week.

In 2014 Trevor visited his doctor because of an eye infection. His GP sent him to have a blood test that resulted in a myeloma diagnosis. ‘The first bit of good luck was my GP referred me to Haematologist, Associate Professor Hang Quach, at St Vincent’s Hospital,’ Trevor said.

A/Prof Quach started Trevor on a six month treatment journey to lower prepare him for a stem cell transplant in February 2015. Following the transplant, Trevor was put on a maintenance program.

‘Things were going well until I started to experience a form of ‘peripheral neuropathy’, which caused my feet and legs to become numb, and was very painful. Then when I...

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Cedric Wilson has benefited from treatment at St Vincent's Hospital Melbourne

Berwick resident, Cedric Wilson, was first diagnosed with Lymphoma in early 2014, after he started losing weight. Ironically his wife, Sheila, had recently recovered from breast cancer. In October 2014 he fractured his spine and was diagnosed with Multiple Myeloma.

Cedric began his treatment locally with different drug combinations. However, in 2017 his Oncologist suggested a clinical trial. Fortunately, Cedric was accepted into a myeloma clinical trial at St Vincent’s in October 2017.

“I was very lucky to get on the trial. Associate Professor Hang Quach is absolutely fabulous, she not only treats my cancer but she also makes drug adjustments, to manage any side effects, which improves my general wellbeing. The Cancer Centre nurses,...

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St Vincent’s Hospital’s Cancer Centre Chemotherapy Day Unit; Victoria’s Centre for Myeloma Treatment

St Vincent’s Hospital’s Cancer Centre Chemotherapy Day Unit has the auspicious title of being the centre for myeloma treatment in Victoria.

Myeloma is a type of cancer that develops from plasma cells in the bone marrow. Myeloma is often called multiple myeloma because most people (90%) have multiple bone lesions at the time it is diagnosed. Plasma cells are a type of white blood cell found in the bone marrow.

Around 18,000 people in Australia are living with myeloma at any one time. Unfortunately there is currently no cure, but there are some very promising trials and treatments that help to extend and improve the quality of life for patients.

More than 57,000 patients are treated at St Vincent’s world class Cancer Centre each year. The...

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Australian Survivor, Johnny Eastoe, has a personal message for Dry July-ers!

Australian Survivor reality TV star and undisputed quintessential Aussie bloke, Johnny Eastoe, will ditch the booze next month for Dry July 2020, revealing his struggles since leaving the show combined with years of constant and heavy drinking, had taken its toll on him mentally and physically.

Mr Eastoe, an underground mine shift worker in the Goldfields, said he was thrilled to be asked by Cancer Council WA to be a regional Dry July champion, and urged anyone who may be concerned about their drinking, particularly following the COVID-19 lock-down, to sign up or donate.

"Over the past 12 months I have done two seasons of Survivor but coming back to work and reality has been a real struggle," Mr Eastoe said.

"Like a lot of people who...

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